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Re-Imagining Wood Challenge

The Laminated Veneer Cylinder

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Mark Anson Mark Anson 4 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #2137
    Profile photo of Mark Anson
    Mark Anson
    Member

    This work is developing an innovative line of Hollow Structural Wood (HSW) building products, and promoting there applications. The first in the line is the Laminated Veneer Cylinder (LVC), constructed by bonding wood veneers in layers with alternating fibre orientation. Please see attachment “three easy lessons” for an 11″x17″ PDF poster of the concept. This seemed to be the easiest way to arrange images to text.

    Thanks,

    Mark

    [starrater tpl=44 size=’24’]

    Laminated Veneer Cylinder

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  • #2161
    Profile photo of ciscolara
    ciscolara
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    Seems extremely radical idea, that would change the entire current system.

     

    In my opinion, the product would be used in very special situations. Have you concider costs compared to the current system to make dimensioned wood??

    #2168

    So basically, it´s a cross laminated tube made of layers of thin wood, if i am right? If so, how do you think to bring the layers into the tube shape? I can imagine steaming the the planks and then pressing them into a form where they can dry.

    #2169

    And also these tubes would be much lighter compared to massive wood beams. To me it also makes sense in points of strutural strenght towards torsion etc.

    #2185
    Profile photo of Mark Anson
    Mark Anson
    Member

    I posted this idea to show how the micro may impact the macro. A lot of the exciting work being done with wood is a process of disassembling the tree, then reassembling it into something new, almost unrecognizable as wood.   Even at that, we tend to concentrate on the trunk, devaluing the roots, bark, branches and leaves.  Many of my early wood working projects involved taking a chainsaw out to old clearcuts and  finding uses for the abandoned bits. I would love to share some furniture built from the bends of old cedar widow makers.  Or a bridge designed completely from branches that are bent (prestressed) then fixed statically to transfer load.  Compared to some of my other studies, the LVC project has always been a little more practical in nature.

    Since the original idea of the LVC, ten years ago, a fair amount of work has been done to develop the concept.  Certainly the aim has always been to produce a structural building component.  And yes, the strength to weight ratio is fantastic, its wood.  I have built an 8 foot tube from steam bent planks…..it proved to be a lot of work.  A simpler method is to rotory peel the logs.  Once peeled, the veneers naturally want to reassume a round shape.  Why do we force wood to be flat and square? The finer details of construction are not mine to divulge.

    #2195
    Profile photo of Mark Anson
    Mark Anson
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    I am interested in potential uses that people could see in a wooden tube.  Imagine that I can tailor them to any strength requirement.

    #2214

    Hm, one possible application of tubes like that could be using them as insulation for heating pipes as wood has a relatively low heat conductance.

    But also as an element for construction it would make sense. Beams with a circular cross section are much more resilient towards tension than those with a rectangular cross section.

    #2215

    Using wood for making tubes also allows the element to swing instead of break, like a beam made of steel would do.

     

    #2232
    Profile photo of Mark Anson
    Mark Anson
    Member

    I’m with you with regards to insulation, plus…… Wood is way less likely to have problems with condensation, it is also a natural sound absorber, and very resilient to impact loads (or earthquakes).  Perhaps we should be discussing duct pipes?

    #2265

    Have you done any seismic testing with the cylinder? You say it is very resilient to impact loads but earthquakes are dynamic loads, with the most destructive forces being the Love and Rayleigh waves (the surface waves). Wood generally absorbs the energy from earthquakes, with engineered wood even more so, and therefore I am curious how the cylinder performs.

    If it performs well there could be interesting applications of it for buildings in seismic areas around the globe, possibly particularly so in areas where people to abandon more traditional building methods in favour of concrete and cement blocks, which perform poorly when stressed.

    #2293
    Profile photo of D Gaker
    D Gaker
    Member

    One of the great aspects of laminated wood is that it can be built into any shape that the structure requires.  This can result not only in very efficient use of materials but also elegant shapes designed to carry the loads of a building.

    #2347
    Profile photo of D Gaker
    D Gaker
    Member

    Perhaps a minor note, but this also provides a chase for utilities instead of leaving conduit exposed.

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    #2358

    @Saskia: The point with seismic stress is a good point. But i think the critical point will not be the cylinder itself but the mounting of it. In almost any case this is where a load bearing support will fail. So Mark, do you have any idea yet how to solve that problem?

    #2375
    Profile photo of D Gaker
    D Gaker
    Member

    The key for reducing problems at the support is distributing the load as much as possible.

    To avoid stress concentrations, a flange joint could be used with adhesive to the wood cylinder.

    http://www.coastalflange.com/lapjointpipeflanges.html

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    #2380

    With regards to seismic stresses, for a structure to survive the seismic energy needs to be dissipated, which can be achieved through three main mechanisms (1) material damping (in this case damping by the cylinder), (2) friction or (3) connection deformation. The latter third calls for ductile connections to be made, so perhaps a flange-like joint but without the adhesive?

     

    #2381
    Profile photo of D Gaker
    D Gaker
    Member

    I know there is also concern for uplift in seismic loading (and even wind loading), so there would have to be some sort of connection.  Perhaps something other than adhesive but also not piercing the column.

    http://timberframehome.wordpress.com/tag/residential-project/

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