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In this challenge,How can exciting new forest-based bio-materials contribute to green, high-performance building systems of the future. Read more about the challenge.

First Prize $2500 CDN

Johannes Schneider (1), Delaney Boyd (2)

Acou-Ply

Given the common use of conventional plywood for floor and wall sheathing, it is an all to common phenomenon to hear the klip-klop of shoes radiating through from floors above, or to heavily apply wall insulation, especially over gaps between boards, to ward off the cold. While plywood on its own provides almost no acoustic or thermal protection, creative hybridization of bio fibre materials with plywood has great potential to unify the advantages of wood products with varying densities, and elegantly improve traditional building construction.

First Prize (Acou-Ply) - Read More...

First Prize $2500 CDN

Johannes Schneider (1), Delaney Boyd (2)

(1) Dipl. Ing.(bau), Ph.D. candidate in Civil Engineering at University of British Columbia
(2) B.Sc., M.E.Des., Ph.D. candidate in Environmental Design at University of Calgary

Given the common use of conventional plywood for floor and wall sheathing, it is an all-toocommon phenomenon to hear the klip-klop of shoes radiating through from floors above, or to heavily apply wall insulation, especially over gaps between boards, to ward off the cold.
While plywood on its own provides almost no acoustic or thermal protection, creative
hybridization of bio fibre materials with plywood has great potential to unify the advantages of wood products with varying densities, and elegantly improve traditional building construction.

This design, coined Acou-ply (for acoustic plywood), comprises two layers of plywood with a 40-mm soft wood fibre core. Increasing in popularity in Europe, soft wood fibre boards, such as marketed by GUTEX (λ-value of 0.043 W/mK), are bio materials with excellent noisedampening and insulating properties. For this design, the soft core is sandwiched by glued plywood layersto create a composite board, which can be applied as a floor board over joists or on the outside of timber frame walls.

The three layers within each board are slightly offset, creating a strong, stepped panel
interface that eliminates any gaps from top to bottom. This continuous and closed sheathing layer is further augmented through use of tongue and groove connections on the plywood ends glued upon installation. A key advantage of this gapless connection design is that the boards can be screwed in place regardless of the joist or stud spacing. Heightened acoustic dampening is achieved by ensuring that the screws pass entirely through the top layer of plywood, thereby preventing any sound bridging along the fasteners. As well, sound transmission is interrupted by removing the top two layers of the floor boards at points where the timber framing of interior walls attaches to the floors(therefore, contact is made with only the bottom layer of plywood).[starrater tpl=44 size=’24’] Related links for the soft wood fibre material:

http://www.gutex.de/
Gutex Thermosafe-nf, Thermoflat, Thermofloor

http://www.pavatex.co.uk/en/home/
Pavatherm, Pavaflex

Second Prize $1500 CDN

Saskia and Rob van Manen

Building Health

With 51% of the global population living in an urban setting and an annual increase of 1.5-2% forecasted, addressing the main challenges of city living is paramount to ensuring wellbeing. The main concerns in urban areas are clean drinking water, waste management, air pollution, transportation and effects of climate change. Increasingly social aspects of populations are becoming important, with safety, ageing populations and isolation as primary concerns. These matters, as well as modular design, should be considered in the development of pre-fabricated building panels.

Second Prize (Building Health) - Read More...

Second Prize $1500 CDN

Building-HealthWith 51% of the global population living in an urban setting and an annual increase of 1.5-2% forecasted, addressing the main challenges of city living is paramount to ensuring wellbeing. The main concerns in urban areas are clean drinking water, waste management, air pollution, transportation and effects of climate change. Increasingly social aspects of populations are becoming important, with safety, ageing populations and isolation as primary concerns. These matters, as well as modular design, should be considered in the development of pre-fabricated building panels.

The ‘Building health’ concept examines how healthy (e.g. sustainable) buildings provide more than a roof over our head by contributing to physical and emotional welfare.

Urban homes become ‘private pods’ clustered around shared green spaces that can be used for recreation and/or crop cultivation, promoting safe cohesive communities (sketches on the attached image). Each pod faces green space on 3 of its 6 sides providing an open spacious feel; single story pods are covered by a rooftop garden accessible from dual story pods, enabling everyone to enjoy outdoor space. Double story pods are covered in solar panels. Privacy in these high population density communities is maintained through intelligent use of new materials and technology in pre-fabricated multi-functional multi-layer panels.

One of the main tasks of these panels is filtering of rainwater. Rainwater catchments created on top of the buildings enable water to trickle down a nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) filter, after which the clean water runs into a large subterranean reservoir.

Externally the panels are covered in a layer of plants. Not only do these contribute to air quality and green space, shown to reduce stress levels, their roots provide an additional layer of thermal and acoustic insulation.

Internally the panels are covered by a screen, enabling the inhabitant to personalise the décor as desired. A switchable NCC film that allows for clear, one-way or opaque windows, ensuring privacy, will cover glazed sections. The size of the buildings can be varied and scaled-up to allow for communal spaces such as schools.

Developed in collaboration with Rob van Manen.